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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

U.U      l-LUli.
u appears to me as oua to write to you oi St. Peter's, as it would do to you to write of Westminster Abbey. Besides, as one looks at churches, &c.} with a book of travels in one's hand, and sees everything particularised there, it would appear transcribing, to write upon the same subjects. I know you will hate me for this declaration; I remember how ill I used to take it when anybody served me so that was travelling.—Well, I will tell you something, if you will love me: You have seen prints of the ruins of the temple of Minerva Medica; you shall only hear its situation, and then figure what a villa might be laid out there. 'Tis in the middle of a garden : at a little distance are two subterraneous grottos, which were the burial-places of the liberti of Augustus. There are all the niches and covers of the urns with the inscriptions remaining; and in one, very considerable remains of an ancient stucco ceiling with paintings in grotesque. Some of the walks would terminate upon the Castellum Aquae Martiae, St. John Lateran, and St. Maria Maggiore, besides other churches; the walls of the garden would be two aqueducts, and the entrance through one of the old gates of Borne. This glorious spot is neglected, and only serves for a small vineyard and kitchen-garden.
I am very glad that I see Rome while it yet exists; before a great number of years are elapsed, I question whether it will be worth seeing. Between the ignorance and poverty of the present Eomans, everything is neglected and falling to decay; the villas are entirely out of repair, and the palaces so ill kept, that half the pictures are spoiled by damp. At the villa Ludovisi is a large oracular head of red marble, colossal, and with vast foramina for the eyes and mouth:— the man that showed the palace said it was tm ritratto della famiglia! The Cardinal Corsini1 has so thoroughly pushed
.DETTTO 27.—i Thus described by 'Clero tonsure1, Morentin, neveu du JJe Crosses (JLeUns Familteres, LI): pape aotuel, peu d'esprit, moins de